Mersey Bluff

The waters of the Mersey River travel 147km from Lake Meston in the Walls of Jerusalem National Park to escape into Bass Strait at Mersey Bluff on the northwest coast of Tasmania.

1.Mersey Bluff

The dolerite headland was formed 185 million years ago in the Jurassic Age. As the rock cooled, joints and fractures were created along with some very flat surfaces, providing places where the Aborigines would sit and carve.

2.Mersey Bluff

Tiagarra Aboriginal Cultural Centre and Keeping Place has been closed for quite some time due to lack of funding. The building houses the history, art and culture of the Tasmanian Aboriginal people and there are several rock carvings and middens along the bluff walk.

3.Tiagarra

The lighthouse was completed in 1889 and was automated in 1920. The addition of four vertical red stripes in 1929 make it quite distinctive.

We followed the footpath around the bluff with spectacular views of the coastline to the east.

6.Mersey Bluff

There are many rock formations along the way, it’s not difficult to see why this one is called ‘the hat’.

7.The Hat

The lighthouse receded behind us

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as we rounded the point, the sun highlighting the colours in the rocks.

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I could sit for hours and watch the incoming tide sneak its way into each crevice, retreating angrily in defeat.

10.Mersey Bluff

11.Mersey Bluff

Diamonds sparkled on the water as far as the horizon.

14.Mersey Bluff

We passed a craggy memorial to a brave young man who lost his life while trying to save another.

17.Mersey Bluff

The path continues to Mersey Bluff Reserve but we took the short cut back instead, through the picnic ground with serene water views.

19.Mersey Bluff20.Mersey Bluff

Cape Naturaliste

We continued our traversal of Geographe Bay to our destination, Cape Naturaliste lighthouse.

1.lighthouse

The tower was constructed in 1903 from local limestone and was activated the following year.

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Unfortunately, we weren’t able to tour the lighthouse which is now fully automated, being the last lighthouse in Western Australia to lose its keeper in 1996.

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At the northernmost point in the Margaret River Region, positioned on a 100m high bluff, the views were spectacular.

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Stormclouds were gathering out to sea.

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It is little wonder the French navigator, Nicolas Baudin, named Geographe Bay after his flagship and the cape after his second ship, Naturaliste.

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The traditional owners of the land, the Wardandi, call it Kwirreejeenungup:

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“the place with the beautiful view”.

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