Spirit Bar

We don’t tend to venture out in the evenings, especially in winter, unless the enticement of food and beverage is involved. Last Saturday was one such occasion, with the added incentive of superb entertainment.

3.street signage

Occupying the ground floor of a gorgeous old building in Burnie,

1.Spirit Bar

the Spirit Bar proudly serves only Tasmanian beer, cider, wine and spirits. There is a stunning array to choose from, Michael found his favourite.

1a.Quiet Cannon

The inclement weather kept us out of the courtyard,

2.courtyard

but on the other side of the front door

4.front door

the warm, comfortable ambience is inviting.

8.interior

10.interior

The menu offers a delicious selection to choose from for informal grazing.

The building was the first home to the Burnie branch of the Launceston Bank for Savings, the first Tasmanian savings bank, established in 1835. The bank then became Tasmania Bank and was eventually bought by the Commonwealth Bank. The Burnie branch opened in 1928, the photo from that day hangs on the wall

19.Launceston Bank 1928

next to the original bank vault door.

18.vault door

Michael regaled the appreciative audience for two hours, performing originals from The Tramp as well as covers.

Outside, the wet pavement provided the perfect background for inventive promotion.

24.pavement sign

There are no food photos to tempt you as I was otherwise occupied filming Michael’s stellar performance but I will leave you with some sound advice I discovered in the ladies’ loo.

23.sign in ladies' loo

To find out more about the Spirit Bar and their fabulous Tasmanian products, visit  https://www.facebook.com/SpiritBarTasmania/

stormy skies

I have to admit to being a little distracted on my drives to work of late. We have had some atrocious weather – rain, high winds, storms – the upside being the spectacular early morning cloud formations.

1.storm clouds2.storm clouds3.storm clouds4.storm clouds5.storm clouds6.storm clouds7.storm clouds

My journey has been interrupted with frequent pauses to capture the ever changing skyscape.

8.storm clouds9.storm clouds10.storm clouds11.storm clouds12.stormy skies13.stormy skies

Sometimes, the sky resembles the ocean.

14.sky looks like ocean

The drive home brings a different set of surprises.

15.rainbow

dewdrop diamonds

Walking in the forest on a crisp, cold morning after a heavy frost is like strolling through nature’s jewellery store. The sun, low in the sky, turns simple dew drops into glittering diamonds.

1.dewdrops2.dewdrops3.dewdrops4.dewdrops5.dewdrops6.dewdrops

Even those stems bereft of foliage held onto the occasional glistening droplet.

7.dewdrop8.dewdrops9.dewdrops10.Prickly Moses

I was like a child in a sweet shop, I couldn’t get enough of this amazing beauty.

11.dewdrops12.dewdrops13.dewdrop

The gems would disappear as the sun climbed, but for now I was content to experience another of nature’s treats.

14.dewdrop

 

resplendent robin

Winter has arrived and our gorgeous scarlet robins have returned. They form permanent monogamous pairs and move to the open forests during the warmer months, returning to nest in our garden as the days shorten. The male makes quite a show once he is back, letting everyone know this is his territory again. Late one afternoon, he spent quite some time admiring himself in the window. Unfortunately, he was in shade and I didn’t capture him in all his glory.

The next day, Michael sat patiently while the sun shone on the same perch, in the hope of catching the perfect image.

5.no robin

Initially disappointed, he was soon rewarded with a prolonged robin lavation.

The black headed honeyeater seems bemused by the aquatic antics, reluctant to take the plunge.

10.robin & friend

I haven’t seen the female recently and assume she is busy building the nest while he makes himself irresistible.

I’m pleased to say he is not totally narcissistic. While his partner incubates the eggs, he will feed her and both parents share responsibility for feeding the young.

13.robin

lunar landscape

One of the wondrous elements of living in the backwoods is the presence of a clear night sky. Many times, the night is never really dark, the light of the moon and stars filter through the closed curtains. Our last full moon was no exception. One evening, I had tucked myself into bed while Michael accompanied Poppy outside for her bedtime ablution. He promptly returned to retrieve my camera with the message that the moon was amazing. The first photo showed the bright, waning moon shrouded mysteriously in cloud.

1.moon

What followed was nothing less than spectacular. The countless craters, produced by meteor impacts are clearly visible. The dark regions are the seas, though they don’t contain water but are remnants of lava flows on the moon’s surface. Curiously, almost all the moon’s seas are on the side of the moon facing Earth. The light areas are the highlands and the bright rays shooting outward are impact craters. I wonder what is on the dark side of the moon?

2.moon