forest walk

With Michael recently sidelined sporting a badly sprained ankle, I stepped in for Poppy-walking duty. Saturday is always the long walk down the steep hill into our forest. It had been quite a while since my last venture this way and I was amazed how much had changed. The tree ferns are enormous and every shade of green.

If Michael hadn’t pre-warned me about the crayfish burrows on the path, I probably would have stepped on them. Freshwater burrowing crayfish live in tunnel systems in muddy banks, only venturing out at night or in damp, overcast conditions. The Tasmanian genera has claws that open vertically to the body rather than horizontally to allow for larger claws in narrow tunnels. Characteristic ‘chimneys’, some as high as 40cm, announce the entrance to the burrow.

Remnants of an overnight rain shower sparkled on foliage

while contorted trees danced amongst their lofty companions.

I dutifully followed Poppy along the boundary of adjoining farmland

where we attracted the interest of neighbouring cattle who didn’t hesitate to take a closer look.

Our circuit returned us to the forest, the winter season has delivered more firewood from nature,

the manferns are thriving

and the stream is bubbling its way to the Blythe River.

I wisely chose bright red socks for my pilgrimage, all the better to see the leeches that abound in the damp conditions.

remarkable regeneration

After some lovely spring weather, summer has arrived with a cold snap. Plenty of rain, high winds and even snow on some peaks. It is not unusual to lose a few trees during these storms

and a few months ago we lost a magnificent eucalypt along one of our forest paths.

We cut enough wood to clear the path and decided to leave the remainder of the tree where it lay, as nature’s retaining wall.

No surprise that the mosses are thriving

but rather than just giving up, there is new life along the trunk.

The majesty of our surroundings never ceases to amaze me.

Sadly, our peaceful walks in the forest are becoming less and less enjoyable due to the ever increasing presence of a group of dogs who are free to wander and hunt, torture and kill wildlife on our property. The accompaniment of constant manic barking echoing through the trees is far from tranquil. Unfortunately, the owners consider it is a dogs right to roam freely, despite legislation that clearly states, among many other requirements, “The owner or person in charge of a dog must ensure that the dog is not at large.” It is, however, a farmers right to dispatch marauding dogs threatening livestock.

It would be nice to wander our property without the prospect of being confronted by five dogs with their blood up, we all know what animals hunting in a pack are capable of.

Some of you reading this may consider me “precious”. Whether I am or not, my dog certainly is and she is treated with the care and respect she deserves.

autumn leaves

Autumn is a lovely time of year in the garden. The sun is lower in the sky, casting shadows that hint of winter and the deciduous trees shrug off their coats, revealing gangly limbs ready for pruning.

1.autumn trees2.autumn trees

Only nature could paint the colours in the leaves as they turn from green to gold before relinquishing their hold to lay a carpet below.

4.autumn leaves

The blueberry leaves are a stunning shade of red prior to their partition.

7.blueberry leaf

Golden foliage of the Ginkgo slowly descends until only the frame remains.

8.ginkgo

12.ginkgo leaves13.ginkgo

Our gorgeous Ash tree protects the fern garden through summer,

14.Ash tree

relinquishing her frondescence to bathe lilies and irises in winter sunlight.

18.Ash tree

Before long, the buds of spring will appear……

dewdrop diamonds

Walking in the forest on a crisp, cold morning after a heavy frost is like strolling through nature’s jewellery store. The sun, low in the sky, turns simple dew drops into glittering diamonds.

1.dewdrops2.dewdrops3.dewdrops4.dewdrops5.dewdrops6.dewdrops

Even those stems bereft of foliage held onto the occasional glistening droplet.

7.dewdrop8.dewdrops9.dewdrops10.Prickly Moses

I was like a child in a sweet shop, I couldn’t get enough of this amazing beauty.

11.dewdrops12.dewdrops13.dewdrop

The gems would disappear as the sun climbed, but for now I was content to experience another of nature’s treats.

14.dewdrop

 

autumn colours

We have had some perfect winter days this year. Clear, blue skies; crisp, clean air; nothing but the slightest whiff of a breeze. One such Sunday, we put Cooper’s top down and took her for a spin along our favourite coast road.

1.Old Coast Road

Preservation Bay looked particularly stunning.

2.Preservation Bay

We joined the highway at Ulverstone and continued east. There is a park, just before the first exit at Devonport, that we have been meaning to investigate for years. The trees are beautiful any time of year but especially when showing their autumn colours.

3.Forth Road

This was the day for a closer look.

4.autumn colours5.autumn trees

Fallen leaves, still damp from the morning dew, confirmed nature’s artistic talent.

11.autumn leaves

Straggly Eucalypts portrayed an elegant appeal in the morning sunlight,

12.swamp gums

some fascinating fungi camouflaged in the shadows.

13.fungus

Our day out didn’t end there, but that’s another story.