isolation

Some of you will know, at this point in time we should be enjoying the second half of our long awaited holiday in New Zealand. It all came to a very messy end last Wednesday when we learned all Australians had been advised to return home while they still could. We changed our flights to the earliest we could get, which was Monday, and continued with our plans for another three days. We returned the hire car and spent our last night in luxury at the new Novotel at Christchurch Airport. We wandered across to check in at 10.45am for the 1.45pm flight and the queue was already horrendous, it didn’t move at all until 11.20am. It seems that the ban on gatherings of 100 people or more isn’t applicable at airports! Speaking of bans, why has no-one mentioned covering your mouth when you yawn. Have you seen the spray of saliva droplets when someone yawns? Have you noticed how many people at airports yawn, especially when trapped in a check-in queue? Of course, there are those who chose to wear masks. After 22 years of my career working in the operating theatre, I thought I had mastered the face mask but it seems to have evolved into an art form. There is the chin mask, the ‘now you see it, now you don’t’ mask (lowered to the neck to facilitate consumption of a burger), the random scarf or bandana and my favourite, the eye shade mask. Simply invert your complimentary airline eye shades and wear over the nose and mouth!

We finally made it to the desk after fifty minutes and that is only because a very large portion of travellers were removed from the waiting line. It seems their connecting flight from Melbourne to their final destination had been cancelled and they couldn’t enter Australia without an onward flight. Arriving in Melbourne, we made our way to the Domestic Terminal, mortified to discover all seating areas in bars and eateries were closed, only take-away was available. That meant no wine to ease the pain of a four hour wait and a dinner of crisps and a chocolate bar! It also meant those people who would ordinarily have sat eating at tables were now thrown even closer together in the transit lounges.

Finally made it to Devonport soon after 9pm, with the help of wonderful friends our car was waiting for us, the keys with the ground staff. We weren’t allowed contact with anyone and are now in isolation at home for two weeks. Our lovely housesitter, Karen, had to rearrange her plans to depart before we arrived home. She did an amazing job of stocking the freezer, fridge and pantry before departing, thank you Karen, we will want for nothing.

Disappointed as we are to have our adventure cut short, there are worse places to be quarantined.

1.house2.view3.house

We have good company

4.Poppy

and a veggie patch burgeoning with produce.

There are soups and jams to be made as well as gardening to catch up on. We still have 15 cubic metres of mulch to spread

13.mulch

and many odd jobs to complete. I don’t think two weeks will be long enough!

Holy Trinity

There is a spectacular edifice in Launceston that I have long admired and I recently realised how odd it is that when we travel overseas, we eagerly visit cathedrals and churches and yet never indulge here at home. Unbeknown to me, Michael contacted the church and while in Launceston last month, we were guided through Holy Trinity Anglican Church by Janet, an enthusiastic parishioner with an extensive knowledge of local history. The first Holy Trinity Church was built on this site in 1842 but when it became unsafe renowned architect, Alexander North, designed a replacement. The present church opened in 1902

1.south face Holy Trinity Church

and has been added to over the years to more resemble the original design. Described as Federation Gothic, the angles and features are fascinating.

2.Holy Trinity Church3.Holy Trinity Church

8.east face Holy Trinity Church

9.west face Holy Trinity Church

North’s vision of a more imposing structure would have seen a building twice the size with a spectacular spire at the western end.

10.original design

When Alexander North died in 1945, a former colleague designed a rose window in memory of North and his wife which is now mounted and backlit in the foyer of Holy Trinity.

11.rose window

Stepping into the interior of the church, the sheer magnitude and workmanship were breathtaking.

12.looking east

The morning sun is diffused through the glorious stained glass windows at the eastern end,

15.east wall

a memorial to Archdeacon Francis Hales, who presided over Holy Trinity for forty six years.

The massive rose window above represents the sun surrounded by angels.

19.window

On either side of the window, ceramic tiled panels, made in Italy to North’s design, depict incidents in the life of Jesus Christ.

20.ceramic tile panel

Intricately carved choir stalls on either side of the chancel

sit below the organ loft.

23.organ loft

We climbed for a closer look at the magnificent pipe organ, a work of art by George Fincham in the year 1887.

24.organ

From that height, the church took on new proportions

25.north wall from organ loft

and a different perspective of the beautiful altar

26.altar from organ loft

as well as the eastern windows

27.rose window from organ loft28.stained glass window from organ loft

and the detailed stone carvings surrounding them.

Further stained glass work brightens the north wall

and four more light the south transept.

Baptismal fonts often appear understated in their opulent surroundings but this is certainly an exception. An elaborate wooden scale model of the planned spire sits atop the font and is raised and lowered as needed for ceremonies.

40.font

A striking eagle decorates the lectern to the right of the chancel steps

41.lectern

and to the left, another fine example of the use of timber. The pulpit was created by local men from Tasmanian hardwood scaffolding used by the bricklayers in the construction of the church.

42.pulpit

A small rounded side chapel, commonly referred to as the ‘Lady Chapel’ dedicated to the Virgin Mary, is used for more intimate services

43.Lady Chapel

and is graced with more exquisite stained glass and carvings.

47.carving

The church walls are adorned with memorial plaques,

48.north wall

gargoyles and coats of arms and a large honour board remembers 165 Holy Trinity Anglican parishioners who fought in World War I.

51.War Memorial

A big ‘thank you’ to Janet for taking the time to share Holy Trinity with us. Without her inside knowledge, we would have missed so much, including the surprising reflection of the east wall rose window above the western entrance.

52.reflection

Festivale

The first weekend in February brings a very special event to Launceston in the form of Festivale. Our first experience was in 2009 soon after relocating to Tasmania and, even though we had good intentions, we hadn’t attended since. This year we couldn’t resist the drawcard on the music menu. Festivale was launched in 1988 as a big street party in the CBD as part of Australia’s bicentenary celebrations. After seven years in the CBD, the annual event moved to City Park, showcasing Tasmanian gourmet food, wine, beer, cider and spirits along with entertainment by local and interstate artists. Unfortunately, the weather gods did not cooperate this time. We arrived for the 10am opening armed with raincoats and umbrellas and, resisting the temptation at the myriad stalls, sought a hot chocolate starter.

The sounds of jazz filled the park as the Ross Challender Big Band defied the elements,

8.Ross Challender Big Band

their melodies accompanied our survey of produce on offer.

Ample seating, hoping to deflect the rain, awaited in anticipation of the crowds to come.

12.seating

I was more than a little disconcerted when the local constabulary accused me of having them under surveillance but with some smooth talking, I convinced the kindly Commissioner that I was merely there to enjoy the festivities.

15.Commissioner

With wine in hand, we secured seats as the big band concluded their last number.

16.Ross Challender Big Band

The Dave Adams Band changed the tempo and rocked for the next hour before Russell Morris took to the stage. Yes, Russell Morris, Australian rock legend, stirred the gathering with his stalwarts from the early years (I remember The Real Thing from 1969, how can it be that long ago?) as well as his more recent melodies. Natures canopy that had sheltered us from the rain earlier was now shielding us from the sun

17.tree canopy

as the crowd eagerly awaited the main attraction.

18.The Whitlams

The Whitlams have been one of our favourites since their inception nearly thirty years ago yet we had never seen a live performance. They didn’t disappoint and hopefully we will have the opportunity to see them again soon (if you think there are a lot of photos of Tim Freedman, you are absolutely right).

23.The Whitlams

We left our empty friends

28.the last three

and strolled the short distance to our hotel to indulge in a nanna nap before dinner.

29.The Cornwall Hotel

Cascade Brewhouse

When Michael was recently invited to play at Cascade Brewhouse in Hobart, it was the perfect excuse for a short break and an overnight stay. Despite living in Tasmania for ten years, we have never visited Cascade Brewery. The gothic façade of Australia’s oldest operating brewery seems to dwarf the majesty of Mount Wellington.

1.Cascade Brewery

Across the road, the brewhouse is more than just the ticket office for brewery tours.

2.Cascade Brewhouse3.Cascade Brewhouse

Snippets of history await in the entrance hall

and in other rooms adjacent to the light, airy restaurant and bar.

7.restaurant8.bar

While Michael set up his paraphernalia,

I ventured out to explore the three acres of immaculate heritage gardens.

12.fountain13.hop cart14.garden path

It’s easy to see why the venue is perfect for weddings and functions.

15.brewhouse garden

22.garden23.water feature

Needless to say, the afternoon entertainment was superb, as was the beer.

24.Michael

We returned the next morning to sample the new brunch menu, I don’t have photos but believe me, the offerings are amazing. I did take the opportunity of an empty bar

27.bar

to share with you the liquid delicacies on tap at Cascade Brewery.

28.bar

A big thank you to Kirk for your hospitality and generosity, looking forward to catching up again.

Highfield House

I know I’ve said it before but Stanley really is one of our favourite places and having guests from interstate is always a great excuse to return. The drive up the hill to Highfield House and the views as we descend back to the beach are quite spectacular. A few years have passed since we took the time to visit Highfield House so we welcomed the opportunity on a recent expedition. The Van Diemen’s Land Company was formed in 1826  by a group of London based businessmen to establish a wool growing venture on the island. Edward Curr, the chief agent of the VDL Company, arrived at Circular Head in the remote northwest with his family in November 1827. They lived in a small cottage until his new homestead, with twenty four rooms, was completed in 1835.

1.Highfield House

The garden is immaculate

and the house impressive even on an inclement day.

4.Highfield House

Through the front door, down the main hallway

5.hall

we entered the gallery where guests would be welcomed. Portraits and stories of those who lived and worked in the house and around the estate adorn the walls.

6.gallery

Storyboards in each room relate a different part of life at Highfield House, the history of the VDL Company and the settlement of Circular Head. First impressions of the settlers to the wild, rugged northwest are shared in the adjacent drawing room,

7.drawing room

while the failure of the planned fine wool enterprise and hefty financial losses are described in the study.

Across the hall, the china closet displays remnants of crockery that were found during restoration of the house

and parts of the original ceiling and walls have been exposed.

Henry Hellyer travelled to Van Diemen’s Land in 1826 as architect and surveyor for the VDL company. His explorations and mapping of the remote northwest opened up the area to settlement. In 1831, he began designing Highfield House but, sadly, he committed suicide in September 1832 and never saw his plans come to fruition. His adventures are told in the room set up as a nursery.

Beneath the staircase, two cellars provide ample storage for the plethora of goods imported on the Company ships. Detailed inventories indicate the residents of the house wanted for nothing.

Places are set at the dining room table and snippets of conversation are written on the cloth. The clinking of glasses and cutlery accompany the gossip of the day.

22.dining room

25.dining room

Upstairs,

the master bedroom is set out beautifully, though it is shrouded in sadness with the sound of a woman sobbing. Presumably, Elizabeth Curr is mourning the death of her two year old daughter, Julia, in a tragic accident.

28.master bedroom

Conversely, there is a calm ambience with stunning garments laid out

and a surprisingly comfortable ensuite.

32.ensuite

Down the hall, the children’s bedroom seems a bit on the small side for fifteen children, nine sons and six daughters. Apparently, all were sent back to England for schooling around the age of four.

33.children's bedroom

The guest room has a spectacular view of the Nut, the ancient volcanic plug around which the town of Stanley has grown. Suitcases half packed (or unpacked) give the impression of visitors in residence.

Returning to the ground floor, through the Butler’s Pantry (which is now the Reception Office) there is another hall

36.hall

that leads past the larder and pantry ( with more exposed original ceiling)

to the kitchen.

40.kitchen

A collection of not-so-modern appliances make us aware of how arduous the simplest of tasks were at that time.

The kitchen leads to a rear courtyard

46.rear courtyard

and we set off to explore the various outbuildings on the estate. A small stone building houses a chapel on the ground floor

and schoolhouse above.

51.chapel:schoolhouse

There are stables

52.stables

and a large barn that was divided up for separate uses.

56.barns

Through the straw barn

57.straw barn

there is a separate section that houses some old implements including a rather striking woolpress.

At the other end, on a mezzanine level, the original threshing barn is now a popular venue for weddings and functions.

65.threshing barn

Following Curr’s dismissal in 1842, Highfield House has had several owners until 1982 when the State Government acquired the estate. If you are planning on a visit to Stanley, be sure to take the time to explore Highfield House.

66.Highfield House & The Nut