Avon amble

Having explored Shakespeare’s birthplace and home town, it was only right we would visit his place of rest. On the banks of the River Avon, Holy Trinity Church is the oldest building in Stratford. Dating back to 1210, much rebuilding was undertaken between 1465 and 1491. The original wooden spire was replaced in 1763.

1.Holy Trinity Church

There were many fascinating gravestones, these two seemed to be connected in some way.

2.gravestones

I could find no information about Catharine Gill who died in 1868 at the age of 71 (on the right of the photo). However, I found that Abigail Insall, (on the left), who was buried in 1869 at 80 years of age, had lived in this gorgeous semi-detched early Georgian Town House at 4 Tyler Street. I liberated this photo from Google maps.

3.4 Tyler Street

The interior of the church was breathtaking

4.the nave and font

with several huge stained glass windows.

5.stained glass windows

William Shakespeare was buried in 1616 in the chancel alongside other members of his family.

6.the chancel

During services, priests had to stand, which was particularly hard on the older ones. Small hinged seats, called misericords, were installed in the 15th century so the priests could rest, yet appear to be standing up. There are 26 of these misericords and each one has three carvings on the underside, only visible when the seat is folded up. There are no religious scenes but an interesting array of bawdy, theatrical faces – a reminder of the devil’s presence and his search for wayward souls.

7.carvings on misericord seats

The impressive pipe organ dates from 1841 and has undergone several restorations.

8.the organ

Leaving the church, we wandered along the banks of the River Avon enjoying a different perspective of Holy Trinity along the way.

9.Holy Trinity Church10.Holy Trinity Church

The magnificent stained glass window in the chancel was more subdued from the outside.

11.Holy Trinity Church from the east

Autumn leaves littered the path

12.River Walk

and the geese were out for an afternoon walk.

The Tramway Bridge was built in 1822 to carry the horse tramway and is now a footbridge across the river.

15.Tramway Bridge

100 metres to the east, road traffic crosses the river via Clopton Bridge. Built in the 15th century to replace an earlier timber bridge, the reflections from the 14 pointed arches on a clear day would be amazing.

16.Clopton Bridge

Elizabeth Quay

While in Perth, I spent a perfect pre-spring day with a very special friend. We first met thirty years ago when we worked together and hadn’t seen each other for seven years. The wonderful thing about lasting friendships is the years just slip away when you are together again. After a morning coffee and shopping in the city, we indulged in a superb lunch at Zafferano, overlooking the beautiful Swan River. http://zafferano.com.au  Replete and relaxed, we could have stayed all afternoon but some exercise was required to ease the conscience. We made our way to Elizabeth Quay, a waterfront precinct created between the city and the Swan River. Officially opened in January 2016, public opinion was divided on the $440 million development. Making our way from the car park, our first vision was the eight-story high sculpture, Spanda, designed by WA artist Christian de Vietri. Spanda is a Sanskrit word that means ‘divine vibration’ and the artwork represents ripples or orbits, connecting to the ripple design of the pavement. Some have unkindly named it the Big Paperclip.

1.Spanda

At the river end of the 2.7ha inlet, a 20m high suspension bridge connects the western promenade to an island, which then leads to the eastern promenade and back to ‘The Landing’ (and Spanda).

2.suspension bridge

The ferry terminal incorporates another interesting work of art. The Blue Waves depict the motion of the wind billowing around the sky coloured canopy.

3.Blue Waves

A little further on, at the end of the quay, a 5m tall cast aluminium bird in a boat glistened in the sun. ‘First Contact’ was created by indigenous artist Laurel Nannup and was inspired by the local Noongar When the first European settlers arrived in Perth, the local Noongar people’s first visions of the European settlers. From a distance, the sailing ships looked like floating birds bearing the spirits of their ancestors.

4.First Contact

The design of the suspension bridge is even more impressive close up.

5.suspension bridge

Crossing the 110m to the island, the views of the Swan River

6.Swan River

and the city of Perth were stunning.

7.Perth8.Elizabeth Quay

The glass spire of the Bell Tower was built in 1999, long before the conception of Elizabeth Quay. There are 18 bells altogether, the largest 12 are from the church of St Martins-in-the-Fields in Trafalgar Square, London. Quite an interesting story. In the early 1980s, St Martins planned to melt down and recast the ancient bells. A Perth businessman, who also happened to be a bell ringer, found out about the plan and campaigned to bring the bells to WA. After much negotiation, St Martins were given enough copper and tin to cast new bells in exchange for the old ones, which arrives in Perth in the late 1980s. After refurbishment and the creation of six new ones to complete the set, there was no tower big enough to house the nine tonnes of bells. After ten years in storage, the tower was built as part of Perth’s millennium project. Unfortunately, the 30m high copper sails enveloping the bell chamber are now dwarfed by new construction. With three levels of dining and a rooftop bar, The Reveley has prime position when those bells start ringing.

9.Belltower & The Reveley

We returned to our starting point

10.Spanda

with one more mission in mind. What better way to end the day than a handcrafted gelato? Using traditional techniques learned in the Italian town of Bologna, everything is made from scratch in small batches. It was the best gelato I have ever had.

11.Gusto Gelato

Thank you, Hilary, for a fabulous day and wonderful memories. I hope it isn’t another seven years before we meet again.

petal pilferer

We’ve had a lovely display of water irises in our pond this year, the bright yellow contrasting beautifully with the verdant surrounds.

1.water irises2.water iris

Despite the mild weather and lack of winds, the flower heads have been disappearing soon after opening.

3.water iris

While enjoying a morning coffee in the back room last weekend, we found out why.

4.petal thief5.petal thief

The Superb Blue wrens, while being socially monogamous, are apparently the least faithful birds in the world. Although they mate for life and will share the feeding and upbringing of their young, they are remarkably promiscuous. The females have a particular weakness for males bearing a yellow petal.

6.petal thief

She may be courted by up to 13 males in half an hour and, for the right one, will leave the nest, mate with him and return as though nothing happened. Consequently, the offspring in any one brood will have different parentage. Maybe it’s because the male never presents a petal to his mate?

7.petal thief

And why a yellow petal?

8.petal thief

Ayung River

The highlight of our Bali holiday was the white water rafting experience on the Ayung River. From the northern mountains, the Ayung runs for 75 kilometres to Sanur Beach with a series of not too scary class II and III rapids along the way. Once we were kitted out with life-vests, helmets and paddles, we walked the 250 stone steps down to the river.

1.long way down

After further safety instructions, we set off for our 8km ride. There were peaceful moments, cruising along, admiring the verdant scenery.

2.ayung river

We would then hear the words, “boom boom” from the back of the raft, a warning from the guide that we were approaching a rapid.

3.rafting

A bit of mad paddling, hopefully in the right direction, and we returned to cruising mode. We passed intricate carvings in the rocks, depicting the story of Ramanyana, an epic Hindu poem from 400AD. I’m not surprised it took two years to complete. The photos aren’t very clear but you’ll get the idea.

4.sculptures5.sculptures

We indulged in a cooling swim at a particularly tranquil spot, a waterfall offering another dimension for those wanting a shower.

6.cooling off

There were other rafters on the river but we all somehow maintained our own space.

7.bridge

The final rapid was rigged with a company camera so we could all take home an exhausted, exhilarated memento.

8.rafting

There were a different set of stone steps to climb before our reward of lunch, I could hardly walk for three days. A word of advice, if you have sore muscles, do not get a Bali massage! Seeing as we were in the vicinity, we wandered around Ubud after lunch,

9.Ubud

enjoying a beverage while the world passed by. I found the glimpses of life beyond the main street fascinating, so different from our lives here in Tasmania.

10.Ubud11.restaurant Ubud

I have taken the liberty of using some photos taken by our friends on the day. I can’t remember whose was whose but you know who you are and I thank you.

Billy bunny

There is a new resident here at 569. When we first saw him, we assumed he was just passing through but it seems he has made a home here, safe under a spreading grevillea.

1.Billy

Up early in the morning, he starts his day with a wash.

When he saw me watching, he tried to make himself small and thought about retreating.

Deciding I wasn’t a threat, he happily went about his grazing.

9.Phew, that was close

I assume he will leave soon to start a family of his own. Until then, I have named him Billy.

16.Billy