Pugnaloni

I was quite excited when I realised we would be in Acquapendente for the Festa dei Pugnaloni. The origin of the festival dates back to 1166AD when two farmers witnessed the blossoming of a dry cherry tree. This miracle was considered a good omen by the villagers who had been repressed under the reign of Emperor Federico I Barbarossa. Armed with prods and work tools, they destroyed the castle, drove out the tyrant and regained their freedom. The anniversary is celebrated on the third Sunday in May with a procession through the streets and much feasting. In ancient times, the peasants carried goads, implements used for prodding oxen, adorned with flowers to represent the weapons of battle and the cherry blossom.

The pugnaloni have evolved over the centuries and are now superb works of art, created by different groups in the community. Large panels, 2.6 metres wide and 3.6 metres high, are covered with intricate mosaics of leaves and flower petals to create images inspired by the theme of peace and freedom. The week before the main event, we discovered some smaller versions exhibited in the loggia of the town hall.

1.mini Pugnaloni2.mini Pugnaloni3.mini Pugnaloni4.mini Pugnaloni

The Mini Pugnaloni gives the Aquesian children the opportunity to take part in this wonderful celebration.

5.mini Pugnaloni6.mini Pugnaloni7.mini Pugnaloni

We decided not to attend the festival after being advised by some locals that there would be a lot of inebriated people, they obviously thought we were crazy to even contemplate it. We revisited the town a couple of days later but could only find one on display at the town hall, the entry by a group named Via Francigena.

I think patience and a steady hand would be essential attributes for anyone undertaking this art, the results are spectacular.

12.Via Francigena

We later found out the remainder were exhibited in the Duomo and they take turns being centre stage at the town hall.

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