Seggiano

Our drive to Seggiano took a little longer than anticipated with our satnav, Holly, determined to take us through back lanes before doing circuits of the same mountain village a few times. The scenery was spectacular but we did wonder if we would ever find our way out.

Finally ignoring her, we chose to follow the reliable road signs and soon had the medieval village in our sights.

We parked the car at the edge of town and lingered a while, absorbing the breathtaking vista across rolling Tuscan countryside.

Wandering up Viale Santa Caterina, we arrived at Piazza Umberto and spotted the perfect place for lunch.

Despite our convoluted journey, we were too early for meal service so we set off to explore the village.

Seggiano is renowned for its extra-virgin olive oil, produced with the native olive cultivar grown in the region, Olivastra Seggianese. It would have been fascinating to visit the olive oil museum but it was closed. Instead, we followed Via Indipendenza,

passing Chiesa di San Bartolomeo. Built in 1216, the church has been remodelled several times and little of the original remains.

At the end of the road, we retraced our steps

and returned to Piazza Umberto.

The 18th century Chiesa di San Bernardino da Siena is also known as the Church of the Company of Corpus Domini, dedicated to the Body of Christ. The interior is rather unassuming as far as Italian churches go but there are some beautiful paintings, a 14th century Madonna and Child and a reliquary that belonged to St Bernardino himself.

Still too early for lunch, we ordered coffee and a biscuit at Antico Borgo to await the magic hour of mezzogiorno e mezzo (that’s 12.30pm).

The restaurant was amazing, entirely carved out of stone and the meals were delicious but I will tell you about that another time. We returned to the car and one last look at the magnificent panorama

before continuing our adventure at Il Giardino di Daniel Spoerri. From there, we could appreciate the magnitude of the town and realised we had covered a very small section.

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